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NEW RULES FOR YEAR 2016-2017

SHAHID ALI

Commoner
Messages
60
Points
8
SC
189
EOI
2015-07-12
Inv.
2015-09-07
App.
2015-11-05
Grant
2016-04-14
Hello everybody.

I just heard from some of my friends that DIBP is putting a limit on number of immigrants from each country starting from year 2016-2017 ( i.e. from 1-July-2016 to 30-June-2017) .

1- Does anybody know about all the new rules which will be implemented?

2- How the applicant before 1-July-2016 will be treated? According to new rules or as per existing rules?

Thanks and Best Regards,
Shahid Ali.
 

MysticRiver

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
15,113
Points
113
I haven't heard of any such rumor, and there has not been any official announcement regarding this. So I guess nobody can tell with certainty.
 

SHAHID ALI

Commoner
Messages
60
Points
8
SC
189
EOI
2015-07-12
Inv.
2015-09-07
App.
2015-11-05
Grant
2016-04-14
I haven't heard of any such rumor, and there has not been any official announcement regarding this. So I guess nobody can tell with certainty.
Thank you but normally when this information is available on DIBP site?
 

Shaikh Haroon

Newbie
Messages
2
Points
1
Timeline missing
Anyone has heard of nnew points Test Draft from November 2015

http://www.iscah.com/new-points-test-draft-from-november-2015/


The Federal Government are currently undertaking a review of the Australian migration system. A Draft report was published in November 2015 and provided the following comments in relation to the Skilled (points Test) categories.

They are important in that they give some guidance into how DIBP will structure their new points test which is expected later in 2016 …

Comments from the Report
———————————–

There is a case for adjusting the selection of skilled immigrants
Across the skill stream as a whole, immigrants’ skill levels are broadly similar to those of the Australian born population. However, within the skill stream there is significant variation. The relatively poor labour market outcomes of onshore independent skilled immigrants suggest that there is scope to improve the labour market outcomes of the skilled immigration stream overall by adjusting the eligibility criteria for this visa subclass.

One option would be to radically change the approach to selection of all skilled immigrants, such as by imposing a points test on all applicants, similar to the Canadian system. However, this would not address the most problematic subclass the onshore independent subclass which is already subject to a points test. It would add extra administration to employer
nominated skilled immigration (which performs well).

On balance it is unlikely that imposing extra bureaucracy to the entire skilled immigration program to address deficiencies in one visa subclass would improve skilled immigrants’ labour market outcomes significantly. An alternative would be to make targeted adjustments to the eligibility criteria, including:

• increasing the points granted for superior English language skills (currently superior English attracts 20 points)

• granting more points to graduates who have studied in fields which are under supplied (or penalising graduates in over-supplied fields)

• granting more points to applicants who have achieved better academic results (currently points are granted based on the award of a degree from a recognised institution; academic success is not taken into account) for example those with a distinction or high distinction average, honours and higher degrees

• reducing the occupational ceilings for over-supplied fields

• capping the onshore independent visa subclass (which would implicitly increase the points test pass mark for the subclass each year).

Of these options, the Commission favours the first three. Increasing the points granted to applicants who have desirable human capital characteristics (English language skills and
high marks in fields that are not over supplied) would be consistent with the objective of identifying immigrants who are likely to meet Australia’s longer term labour market needs.

Reducing the occupational ceilings for over supplied fields would be a less targeted approach, particularly if applications are processed in the order they are lodged.
 

MysticRiver

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
15,113
Points
113
Interesting, though I am not sure if this is going to be implemented in practice as it'll complicate the system further. Here is my thought regarding the 5 points you mentioned:

1 & 2. I won't mind. Though 1 seems little bit of overthinking as 20 points is still high.

3. Not sure how they benchmark the result as it'll vary a lot from country to country and institution to institution. I know many private institutions in many countries which offer more grades to attract more student. So I think this is a stupid idea.

4. They already have that in place, don't they? If you see occupation ceiling, you'll see different caps for different occupation.

5. May be a good idea, may be not. Not sure with certainty.
 
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